Monday, April 18, 2016

Markets and Fairs - James City Co. VA Wills, Estates - #genealogy - #virginiapioneers.net

Markets and Fairs

By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
In 1649, the local authorities decided to hold markets every week in Jamestown, which was one form of a familiar English fair. English fairs were the oldest of the trade institutions and were encouraged during an age when the population was sparse. People could come together from a distance and exchange their products. The Jamestown markets were restricted to Wednesdays and Saturdays of each week and the boundaries of a site were carefully laid off. The market place in Jamestown extended from the eastern side of the James River for two miles. Source: Hening's Statutes, vol. I, p. 362. 

More information concerning Virginia adventurers and their origins is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers 

Norwich Market
1799 Norwick Market in England


James City County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Settlers to Jamestown

Map of JamestownJames City County was created in 1634 as James City Shire by order of King Charles I. The county seat is Williamsburg, Virginia which was first settled in 1607 by English colonists. amestown, which evolved into James City County, was named for King James I. When King James revoked the charter of the London Company in 1624, Virginia became England?s first royal colony. By 1634, the colony divided into eight counties, among them were James City and the Charles River, now known as York. The division into counties laid the foundations for strong local government that later served as a model to states as they were admitted into the union. Every year until 1632, the Assembly met at the Jamestown church. The Assembly is believed to have met in the home of the governor until about 1699 when the capital was moved inland to Middle Plantation, which was renamed Williamsburg. Moving the county seat was unpopular with local residents, however in 1715 it was was moved from Jamestown to Williamsburg. Some very historical events occurred in Jamestown. For one thing, the rebellion of Nathaniel Bacon and his followers in an effort to get the governor to prevent Indian raids and massacres, burned Jamestown.

James City County Records available to members of Virginia Pioneers
  • 1607 Settlers of Jamestown(list of names)
Digital Images of Will Book No. 1, 1865 to 1887

Testators: Allen, William ;| Ashlock, Richard |Barnes, William H. | Bennett, Abel | Bragg, Hugh | Bratcliff, George | Browning, A. J. | Browning, Absalom, estate | Bush, William, estate | Canaday, Jonathan | Chapman, Aaron | Clowe, John, estate | Davis, Benjamin Allen | Debriss, William | Dibble, A. S. | Fielding, Jeremiah, estate | Fox, George W. | Hankins, George | Harrell, Burrell | Harris, Abby | Hazlewood, George | Henley, Thomas | Hinson, John | Hockaday, Susan | Hockaday, William, estate | Hubbard, Charles M. | Hubbard, William B., estate | Hundley, Judith | Hundley, Thomas | Jackson, John | Jones, Henley (trust) | Jones, John W. | Jones, William M. | Knight, Garrett | Marston, Dandridge | Merridith, John | Minor, William J. | Moore, Horace, estate | Moore, Moses | Morris, James S. | Mulford, Furman | Peggott, Nathaniel | Pierce, Elizabeth B. | Pitts, Simeon | Post, Christopher | Power, H. S. B. | Ratcliffe, John | Richardson, B. M., estate | Richardson, Elizabeth | Russell, Simon, estate | Scarborough, James | Slater, Beverly | Spencer, Martha | Stewart, George W., estate | Spraggins, S. B., estate | Taylor, Frances P. | Taylor, Mathew, estate | Taylor, P. A. | Taylor, Robert P. | Taylor, Thomas | Turner, Archer | Vaiden, Ann | Van Horne, Cornelius | Waller, Littleton | Wallis, Archer | Walls, William B. | Whitaker, R. H., estate | Wilbern, William | Wilkins, John W., ward | Wise, David, estate | Wynne, Thomas | Yerby, William, estate

Magazine Ships

What is a Magazine Ship?

The magazine is the name of a place where ammunition is stored on board a vessel and included explosive materials. The London Company was quite strict in the weapons sent to the colony and the affairs of the magazine were administered by a director who was assisted by a committee of five counselors. One the cargo was received into the colony, the accounts thereof were required to be passed upon by a team of auditors specially nominated in a Quarter Court. Thus, the weapons received into the colony for defensive maneuvers were carefully guarded as they were sorely needed by the colonists as a defense against a huge population of marauding Indian tribes in the region.

This means that the adventurers held separate meetings to conduct all routine business affairs. During the settlement of Jamestown, no outside trader was permitted to ship supplies into the Colony. The first vessels were referred to as Supply ships because they transported supplies into the Colony as well as a those passengers proposing to reside in Virginia. Fevers, dysentery and Indian attacks were a way of life and restricted the settlers to reside within the confines of a palisade fence. The first ten years or so, a number of Supply ships arrived in the colony and it was not uncommon for the settlers to assume the return voyage to England in search of a new wife to replace the one which had died.

After the year of 1619, the vessel which conveyed articles and supplies into the Jamestown settlement were called a magazine ships. The articles purchased by the adventurers who entered into a joint stock (known as the magazine) were conveyed by the magazine ship to the New World. Also, its cargo was confined to necessities. Several immigrants were appointed to take charge of the goods both before and after the vessel arrived in Jamestown. The first magazine vessel was called the Susan, a small vessel whose cargo was restricted only to that clothing which the Colonists needed the most. The goods of the Susan were placed in the care of Abraham Piersey as the Cape Merchant, both during the voyage and after Virginia was reached. As the struggling colonists commenced their chores, the only commodities produced were those which assured a profit when sold in England, such as tobacco and sassafras. The exported cargo was then exchanged for the contents of the arriving magazine ship.

Miscellaneous Documents

Broadribb, William, LWT, transcription
Madison, James, LWT (1812), transcription
Randolph, John (Sir) of Williamsburg, LWT (1735), transcription
Rolfe, Johis, LWT, transcription
Sherwood, William, LWT, transcription
Taliaferro, Richard, LWT, transcription

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