Saturday, July 22, 2017

Names of Earliest Settlers to Essex County VA on this Map #genealogy #virginiapioneers

Names of Earliest Settlers on this Map 

Map of First Plantations in Essex CountyThis map depicts the locations of the first settlers to Essex County, viz: Dangerfield, Layton, Payne, Garnet, Smith, Lowry, Young, Hill and Bowler. Tappahannock was a large community of these settlers. Henry Aubrey established his plantation on Hodgkins Creek (later Hoskins Creek) where he raised hogs, cattle and sheep. Upon his death in 1694, he left much of the cattle to servants, and 700 acres to his son, Richard Aubrey on Hodgkins Creek. He lived the typical life of a planter in Essex County, of feather beds, fine linen and a silver tankard which he bequeathed to his wife. Also, there were orchard buildings to accommodate fruit crops. 

The images of the earliest wills are available to members of Virginia Pioneers Also, the Wills and Estates probated from 1692 to 1695 were the following first settlers: Henry Awbrey, Elizabeth Browne, Thomas Cooper, Richard Holt, Martin Johnson, John Jones, Thomas Pettit, Griffin Roberts, John Smith, John Waters and Thomas Williamson. More Wills and Estates were recently added dating from 1717 to 1721; 1722 to 1730. 

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Friday, July 21, 2017

Prince Charles will NOT be Charles II #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

No, Prince Charles will not be Charles II: Rather Charles III 

Charles ICharles ICharles IICharles IICharles III, Prince of WalesCharles III, Prince of Wales


Charles I of England ruled during the early formation of the American colonies. He was born in Fife on 19 November 1600, the second son of James VI of Scotland (and James I of England) and Anne of Denmark and became heir to the throne of England upon the death of his brother, Prince Henry in 1612. His 1625 succession was as the second Stuart King of Great Britain. Because of the controversy during his reign and the time that Jamestown colonists were sending their first Burgesses to London to settle matters of tobacco tax, the king was not convening Parliament. However, as he engaged in wars with France and Spain and sent the Duke of Buckingham to France to gain political influence and military power, the intense dislike for this duke brought about his impeachment in 1628. Charles was compelled to recall Parliament during April of 1640 to request funds for war against the Scots, and again in November. During the reign of Charles I, the colonies suffered a massacre near Jamestown (1622/3) which killed most of the white population. 

Charles II assumed the throne of England in 1630 after the execution of his father (Charles I) at Whitehall on 30 January 1649. Although the Parliament of Scotland proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the "English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth," and the country was a de facto republic led by Oliver Cromwell. In 1651, Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Thus, Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland while Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands. Upon the death of Cromwell in 1658, a political crisis ensued which resulted in the restoration of the monarchy, and Charles was invited to return to Britain. On 29 May 1660, his 30th birthday, he was received in London to public acclaim. After the year of 1660, all legal documents were dated as though he had succeeded his father as king in 1649. Ultimately, his reign was successful and he was a popular and beloved King. Virginians fared better under Charles II, despite English traderegulations and taxes imposed upon the colonists. 

Thus, Prince Charles of Wales will assume the title of Charles III after the death of Queen Elizabeth. 


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Thursday, July 20, 2017

Trace your Families in AL GA KY NC SC TN VA #genealogy


Georgia Pioneers.com is pleased to announce the addition of genealogy databases and images in the States of : Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Included are wills, estates, bibles, cemeteries, pensions, obituaries, and more.  To subscribe now click on the link below (or copy it into your browser)


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Genealogy Added in 7 States

Georgia Pioneers.com is pleased to announce the addition of genealogy databases and images in the States of : Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Included are wills, estates, bibles, cemeteries, pensions, obituaries, and more.  To subscribe now click on the link below (or copy it into your browser)
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County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

Prices Increased During the War of 1812 #virginiapioneersnet #virginiagenealogies #historicalarticles

The Prices of Commodities Jumped During the War of 1812 

General ArmstrongIn war, as in other troublesome times, prices are subject to fluctuate in price. Two great staples were flour and sugar, mostly lacking due to impeded water transport. From a table of prices current, of August, 1813, it appears that at Baltimore, in the center of the wheat export, flour was $6.00 per barrel; in Philadelphia, $7.50; in New York, $8.50; in Boston, $11.87. At Richmond, owing to inferior communications, the price was $4.00. Flour at Charleston was reported at $8.00, while at Wilmington, North Carolina, it was $10.25. At Boston, sugar which was not blockaded, was quoted at $18.75 the hundredweight, itself not a low rate; while at New York the blockaded rate was $21.50; at Philadelphia, with a longer journey, $22.50; at Baltimore, $26.50. At Savannah sugar was $20, because considering its nearness to the Florida line and inland navigation, smuggling was a successful and safe venture. New Orleans was a sugar-producing district, and the cost was $9.00, however, on February 1, 1813, flour in that city cost $25 a barrel. The British vessels forcibly harassed trade up and down the east coast, especially between Boston and New York. Although the South was more remotely situated, it had better internal water communications. Also, the local product, rice, went far to supply deficiencies in other grains. In the matter of manufactured goods, however, the disadvantage of the South was greater. These had to find their way there from the farther extreme of the land; for the development of manufactures had been much the most marked in the east. It has before been quoted that some wagons loaded with dry goods were forty-six days in accomplishing the journey from Philadelphia to Georgetown, South Carolina, in May of this year. Some relief in these articles reached the South by smuggling across the Florida line, and the Spanish waters opposite St. Marys were at this time thronged with merchant shipping to an unprecedented extent; for although smuggling was continual, in peace as in war, across a river frontier of a hundred miles, the stringent demand consequent upon the interruption of coast wise traffic provoked an increased supply. "The trade to Amelia," the northernmost of the Spanish sea-islands, was reported by the United States naval officer at St. Marys towards the end of the war, "is immense. Upwards of fifty square-rigged vessels are now in that port under Swedish, Russian, and Spanish colors, two thirds of which are considered British property." Letters from the naval captains commanding the stations at Charleston, Savannah, and Portsmouth, New Hampshire reflect news of the molesting by the British of trade. Captain Hull who commanded the Portsmouth Yard, wore on June 14, 1813, that light cruisers like the "Siren", lately arrived at Boston, and the "Enterprise," could be very useful in driving away the small vessels of the enemy as well as privateers. He purposes to order them eastward, along the Maine coast, to collect coasters in convoy and protect their long-shore voyages, after the British fashion on the high seas. "The coasting trade here," he adds, "is immense. Not less than fifty sail last night anchored in this harbor, bound to Boston and other points south.": And, the "Nautilus" (a captured United States brig) has been seen from this harbor every week for some time past, and several other vessels (of the enemy) are on the coast every few days." An American privateer has just come in, bringing with her as a prize one of her own class, called the "Liverpool Packet," which "within six months has taken from us property to an immense amount." On one occasion the crew of the ship of an American privateer, which had been destroyed after a desperate and celebrated resistance to attack by British armed boats, arrived at St. Marys. Of one hundred and nineteen American seamen, only four could be prevailed upon to enter the district naval force. This was partly due to the embarrassment of the national finances. "The want of funds to pay off discharged men," wrote the naval captain at Charleston, "has given such a character to the navy as to stop recruiting." "Men could be had," reported his colleague at St. Marys, now transferred to Savannah, "were it not for the Treasury notes, which cannot be passed at less than five per cent discount. Men will not ship without cash. There are upwards of a hundred seamen in port, but they refuse to enter, even though we offer to ship for a month only." It should be noted, however, that those who enlisted during the War of 1812 were promised bounty lands, should they serve five years. Those sailors stationed at St. Marys, Georgia, received land grants in Camden County of 487-1/2 acres. This is an interesting facet to research because where one sees this sort of acreage listed in the deed records or on tax digests, they should investigate the 1812 service records on the site of the National Archives. This will help zero in on more clues and historical data. In these operations the ships of war were seconded by privateers from the West Indies, which hovered round this coast, as the Halifax vessels did round that of New England, seeking such scraps of prize money as might be left over from the ruin of American commerce and the immunities of the licensed traders. The United States officers at Charleston and Savannah were at their wits ends to provide security with their scanty means, more scanty even in men than in vessels; and when there came upon them the additional duty of enforcing the embargo of December, 1813, in the many quarters, and against the various subterfuges, by which evasion would be attempted, the task was manifestly impossible. "This is the most convenient part of the world for illicit trade that I have ever seen," wrote Campbell. A somewhat singular incidental circumstance is found in the spasmodic elevation of the North Carolina coast into momentary commercial consequence as a place of entry and deposit; not indeed to a very great extent, but ameliorating to a slight degree the deprivation of the regions lying north and south, the neighborhood of Charleston on the one hand, of Richmond and Baltimore on the other. "The waters of North Carolina, from Wilmington to Ocracoke, though not favorable to commerce in time of peace, by reason of their shallowness and the danger of the coast, became important and useful in time of war, and a very considerable trade was prosecuted from and into those waters during the late war, and a coasting trade as far as Charleston, attended with less risk than many would imagine. A vessel may prosecute a voyage from Elizabeth City (near the Virginia line) to Charleston without being at sea more than a few hours at any one time." During July of 1813, Admiral Cockburn anchored with a division off Ocracoke bar, and captured a privateer and Letter-of-Marque which had there sought a refuge denied to them by the blockade elsewhere. The towns of Beaufort and Portsmouth were occupied for some hours. The United States naval officer at Charleston found it necessary also to extend the alongshore cruises of his schooners as far as Cape Fear, for the protection. Source: Sea Power In Its Relations to the War of 1812 by Captain A. T. Mahan, D. C. L., LL. D., United State Navy. (London, 1899) Rappahannock Co. VA Genealogy Resources and Histories

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Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Rappahannock Co. VA Genealogy Records, Wills, Estates #virginiapioneersnet

Rappahannock County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Indexes to Probate Records


Rappahannock County Court House
Rappahannock County was first founded in 1656 from part of Lancaster County. Many of the first colonists resided in the area and records exist back to the sixteen hundredths. This old county became extinct in 1692 when it was separated to form Essex and Richmnd Counties. In 1833, the Virginia General Assembly created the currently existing Rappahannock County, taking land from Culpeper County. It was named after the old Rappahannock River which separates it from Fauquier County. The county seat is Washington, Virginia. 

Historical Tidbits: In 1669 Thomas Butler of Rappahannock County bound himself to deliver to George Brown, the captain of the Elizabeth of London, three hogsheads of sweet-scented tobacco belonging to the choicest portion of his crop. Brown was to carry this tobacco to England and there to dispose of it for money sterling. After having laid aside twenty-two pounds for his own use, the amount of a claim which he held against Butler for goods previously sold to him, Brown was to employ whatever remained in buying linen and woollen cloths, shoes and stockings to be conveyed to Butler in Virginia. 

Sources: Records of Rappahannock County, original vol. 1668-1672, p. 291. Want to receive more historical tidbits on Virginians? Join our free blog

Rappahannock County Wills, Estates, Marriages available (wills, estates, etc.) to members of Virginia Pioneers 

(Old, Former County) Rappahannock County Records:
  • Marriages to 1699
Miscellaneous Wills
  • Butler, John Kenny, William
  • Musgrave, Michael, LWT transcript
  • Rowzie, Edward
  • Toone, James (1677), LWT, transcript
Rappahannock County Records

Indexes to Rappahannock Wills and Estates
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book A, 1833-1842
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book B, 1842-1849
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book C, 1849-1855
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book D, 1855-1866
Digital Images of (current) Rappahannock County Wills and Estates
    Wills and Estates, Book A, 1833-1842

    Testators: Adams, Easter; Amiss, Philip; Barnes, Leonard; Best, Enos; Bragg, Thomas; Broaddus, Mary; Burgess, Dawson; Butler, Charles; Butler, Elizabeth; Cannon, Reuben; Carders, George; Carn, John; Cheek, Mary; Cheek, Nancy; Conner, Margaret; Daniel, Nancy; Deatherage, George; Dodson, William; Duncan, Frederick; Duncan, George; Eastham, Bird; Farrow, William; Foley, Thomas; Fristoe, Catherine; Gan, William; Gibson, Mary; Gibson, Moses; Gray, Richard; Griffin, Thomas; Grigsby, S.; Hawkins, Nancy; Hawes, Aylette; Hayne, Sarah; Hughes, Thomas; Jeffries, John; Jeffries, Louiza; Jenkins, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Stephen; Jones, William F.; Jordan, Mary; Kemper, Edmund; Kennard, David; Kittle, Jacob; Lilliard, Clara; Lilliard, Elizabeth; Lunsford, William; Madden, Samuel; Mallard, Susanna; Menfee, James; Miller, Jacob; Miller, John; Miller, Lucy; Murdock, Godfrey; Norman, Aley; Parker, Benjamin; Payne, Frank; Poulter, Jane; Pullen, Ann; Pullen, Thomas; Randall, Francis; Robertson, Elijah; Robertson, Mitchell; Ross, Enos; Rudacilla, Philip; Sims, Reubin; Smith, Jeremiah; Smith, John; Snyder, Daniel; Tapp, Vincent; Thornton, Jane; Turner, Lewis G.; Ubz, Solomon; Waters, Landy; Willey, Edward; Willis, Charles; Withers, James Jr.; Withers, Susannah; Wood, James D.; Yates, Lucy

    Rappahannock Wills, Book B, 1842-1849

    Testators: Berkley, Elizabeth; Brandon, Ezekiel; Brown, George; Brown, William; Browning, John; Calvert, Sylvia; Cheek, George; Corder, John; Duncan, Susan; Fisher, Thomas H.; Green, George James; Green, James; Grigsby, Jane; Haddon, John R.; Hopper, Joshua; Hudson, Robert; Jenkins, Reuben; Jones, Robert; Maddon, Notley; Mason, Catherine; Menefee, Henry; Moore, Lewis Sr.; Mosingo, George; O'Bannon, Bryant; Ritenaur, David; Royston, John; Spiller, Elizabeth; Updike, Daniel; Walden, Lucy; Wood, Burwell K.; Wood, John H.

    Rappahannock County Wills, Book C, 1849-1855

    Testators: Brooke, Reuben; Brown, William P.; Browning, John; Burgess, Francis; Corley, Richard; Deal, Peter; Gibson, Betsy; Hitt, James; Holland, John; Jeffries, Moses; Jenkins, William; Jetts, Susannah; Jones, Henry; Jordan, Absalom; Lodowick, Zadock; Majors, Sarah; Morrison, John; O'Bannon, James; Paylon, John Sr.; Popham, John; Sims, Abner; Sloane, James; Smith, Caleb; Smith, William; Whitehead, Margaret; Woodard, William

    Rappahannock County Wills, Book D, 1855-1866

    Testators: Allen, Madison; Amiss, John; Amiss, Joseph; Blackwell, Sarah; Bolen, W. A.; Brady, John; Brown, Margaret; Browning, Cassandra; Cooksey, Elias; Corbin, Joseph; Corbin, William; Courgill, John; Daniel, Silas; Deal, Allen; Dearing, Alfred; Dearing, Thomas E.; Dearing, Thomas E.; Deatherage, Catharine; Deatherage, George; Dodson, Margaret; Fletcher, Peggy; Fletcher, William; Fristoe, Asenath; Hinson, James; Houghton, Benjamin; Hudson, Alexander; Huff, Isaac; Hughes, Benjamin; Jones, Moses R.; Jones, William; Kemper, Elizabeth; Lalouradair, William; Learen, Hugh; Maddox, Nolly; McQuinn, Strother; Menefee, William; Millan, Francis; Miller, Delila; Miller, Nancy; Moon, Mary; Moore, Mary; Newman, Mary; O'Bannon, Mary; Pullen, Jesse; Reid, Mark; Rollins, Thomas; Rominus, John; Silman, Landon; Sisk, Ellen; Slaughter, Reuben; Stringfellow, Benjamin; Tannehill, William; Wall, Thomas; Whitescarver, Francis; Yates, Paul 

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Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Why the War of 1812 is Rarely Discussed #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy #history #military

Why the War of 1812 is Rarely Discussed

merchant marinerThe War of 1812 was mostly a maritime battle fought in the North Atlantic. During the first several months after war was declared, battles were centered around the Middle States. In fact, on October 14th, 1812, the senior naval officer at Charleston, South Carolina, wrote: "Till today this coast has been clear of enemy cruisers; now Charleston is blockaded by three brigs, two very large, and they have captured nine sail within three miles of the bar." Two months he expressed surprise that the inland navigation behind the sea islands had not been destroyed by the enemy, due to its of its lack of defense. In January of 1813, the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay was guarded by a ship of the line, two frigates and a sloop. A commercial blockade had not been established, yet the hostile divisions remained outside and American vessels continued to go out and in around Charleston. A Letter-of-Marque and Reprisal was a government license authorizing a privateer to attack and capture enemy vessels and bring them before the admiralty courts for condemnation and sale. This method of cruising on the high seas for prizes with a Letter-of-Marque was considered an honorable calling because it combined patriotism and profit. Otherwise, captured vessels were done so by "piracy" which was punishable by law. The privateer employed a fast and weatherly fore-and-aft rigged vessel heavily armed and crewed, and its primary objection was for fighting. There existed a robust trade with France by Letters-of-Marque for commercial vessels which carried cargo and guns. By February 12th of 1813, conditions grow worse. The commercial blockade was proclaimed and blockaders entered the Chesapeake while vessels under neutral flags (Spanish and Swedish) were turned away. Two Letter-of-Marque schooners had been captured, one after a gallant struggle during which her captain was killed. Nautical misadventures of that kind became frequent. On April 3rd, three Letters-of-Marque and a privateer, which had entered the Rappahannock, were attacked at anchor. The Letters-of-Marque had smaller crews and thus offered little resistance to boarding, but the privateer, having near a hundred men, made a sharp resistance. The Americans lost six (killed) and ten were wounded, while Britain had two killed and eleven wounded. Source: Sea Power In Its Relations to the War of 1812 by Captain A. T. Mahan, D. C. L., LL. D., United State Navy. (London, 1899)  Rappahannock Co. VA Genealogies and Histories

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Every Smidget of Information will Eventually Compute #virginiapioneersnet #virginiaancestors #virginiagenealogy

Every Smidget of Information will Eventually Compute 

genealogy detectiveThe genealogy detective writes down every smidget of information, no matter how insignificant it appears at the time. Specifically, all names on deed records, estates, marriages, immigration records and so forth. Once in the American colonies, people moved around searching for fertile soil. They could apply for land patents and grants, and this is always an excellent source. Did you remember to match the acreage of the patent, grant or bounty land with that in the tax records where your ancestor resided? The tax records seem unimportant, however, this is true reporting of assets owned and usually listed the amount of acreage as well as its location. From year to year, the acreage could be different, as the owner passed his land to his children. For better understanding of what was transpiring, look for odd amounts of land owned by everyone with the same surname, and do a mathematical chart on who owned what from one year to the next. If John Doe declared 404 acres of land, and later only 200 acres was reported, then another Doe person might show 204 acres. That would be a relative, probably a son. Moreover, such details help to establish kin ships and a better knowledge of the family. Old plats are helpful because they ascertain land districts, sections and lots as well as the lay of the land in conjunction with local streams, rivers, and the names of neighbors. Details might seem minor at the time, but they help solidify the lineage as the work progresses. The amount of acreage included in bounties, such as revolutionary war pensions, were specific to the length of time during which the soldier served. Another interesting detail, because now one can examine the name of the General or Colonel who signed the certificate awarding the bounty and follow that commanders war activities. In other words, now you have the details of the battles where your ancestor fought. It is the details of genealogical discoveries which piece together a unique history, true to the facts and more accurate even than what one reads in the history books.  Buckingham Co. VA Genealogy Records and Historical Articles

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Accomack Co. VA Wills, Estates, Deeds, Marriages

Accomack County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates



Accomack County Accomac Shire was established in 1634 as one of the original eight shires of Virginia. The name comes from the Native American work Accawmack, meaning on the other side. In 1642 the name was changed to Northampton. Northampton was then divided into two counties in 1663. The northern section assumed the original Accomack name, the southern, Northampton. In 1670, the virginia Colony's Royal Governor William Berkeley abolished Accomack county, but the Virginia General Assembly re-created it in 1671. The justices of Accomac held their terms of court for many years at Pungoteague in the tavern belonging to John Cole, who did not charge for this use. In 1677 it was decided to erect a court-house where the majority of the freeholders chose. Cole, reminding the judges of his liberality, asserted that, having recently purchased the Freeman plantation, he was sure that it would offer a very convenient site for the projected county seat. He also offered to furnish thirty thousand bricks for the construction and also all of the timber. These bricks were to be burned on the spot by James Ewell, who was indebted to Cole. Three years passed and the projected structure had not been completed. In 1680, there was an order of the court directing Major Charles Scarborough to engage workmen at once to proceeding with the construction. Source: Letter of John Cole dated Dec. 20, 1677, Accomac County Records, vol. 1676-8, p. 97. Virginia Historical Tidbits. Join our free blog

Accomack County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Transcripts of County Wills, Inventories, Appraisements, Divisions 1729 to 1737

Ardies, Edward, inventory | Armitrader, Henry | Ash, Bridget | Ashly, Charles | Aymes, James | Bagwell, Henry | Bagwell, John, inventory | Baily, Richard | Baker, John, appraisement | Beavans, William | Bensten, Ambrose | Benstene, James | Benston, James | Benstone, William | Biddle, Thomas, inventory | Blake, John, inventory | Blake, Joseph | Bonnewell, John, division | Bonwell, John, inventory | Bowles, Daniel, inventory | Bradford, William | Brittingham, John, inventory | Brittingham, Nathaniel, Jr. | Brittingham, Samuel, estate | Brymer, Samuel | Bundock, Richard | Burton, Samuel, division | Burton, Thomas | Burton, William | Cole, Robert, appraisement | Copes, Giles | Crippen, Thomas | Cropper, Edmund Bowman, inventory | Croston, Francis | Custis, Hancock | Custis, Henry | Custis, John | Curtler, Richard | Darby, Daniel | Davis, Samuel, inventory | Dix, William | Drumond, Anne, Sr. | Drummond, Hill | Drummond, Richard | Duberly, John, inventory | Dunton, Waterfield, inventory | Edwards, Evan | Ewell, Mark, inventory | Ewell, Solomon | Flack, Mary, inventory | Fletcher, Thomas | Fletcher, William | Gibson, James | Gore, William | Green, John, inventory | Griffin, Elizabeth | Harmanson, Argol | Harmanson, Barbara | Harristoy, John | Heath, William, inventory | Hinman, Benjamin | Hope, Thomas | Huebanks, Mary | Hughs, Joseph, inventory | Hutchinson, John | Jackson, Elizabeth | Jackson, Henry, inventory | Jackson, John | Jenkinson, Thomas | Johnson, George | Johnson, John | Jones, Richard | Justice, Ralph | Kellam, Edward | Kellam, Richard | Knight, George, inventory | Laughlan, Cornelius | Lewis, Elizabeth | Linsey, Elizabeth | Longo, James | Lurton, William, inventory | Major, William | Marshall, John | Mathews, William | Melson, John | Mercy, John | Michael, Simon, inventory | Milby, Garrison | Milby, John, inventory | Milby, Salathiel, inventory | Murray, John | Murrough, Daniel, inventory | O'Grahan, Daniel | Osburne, Jenifer | Owen, Timothy, inventory | Park, Mary | Parker, Dorothy | Parker, George | Patrick, John | Phillips, William Sr. | Powell, John, inventory | Pritchard, William | Pruitt, Catherine, inventory | Read, Henry | Richerson, Charles, inventory | Rite, William | Robins, Edward | Robins, John | Robins, Thomas, inventory | Rogers, John, inventory | Rogers, Peter | Rogers, William | Rowles, Major | Rowles, Daniel Sr. | Sallisbury, John, inventory | Savage, John | Savage, Mary, inventory | Savage, Rowland | Scarburgh, Bennet | Scarburgh, Henry | Scot, Thomas, inventory | Smith, Valentine, inventory | Smith, William, appraisement | Snead, Charles (Capt.), inventory | Solsbery, John | Stockley, Joseph Sr. | Taylor, Charles | Taylor, Joshua, inventory | Taylor, Thomas, appraisement | Taylor (orphan) | Teackles, Margaret | Teackles, Thomas | Tellott, James | Thomson, John, inventory | Tomson, John | Townson, Thomas, inventory | Walker, Joseph | Wallop, Skinner | Watson, Benjamin | Watts, Esther, inventory | Watts, John, inventory | Watts, Priscilla | Watts, William, inventory | Watts, William, orphan | Welburne, Daniel | Welburne, Samuel, inventory | West, Edward, inventory | West, John | West, William | Willis, Daniel, inventory | Wilson, Henry, inventory | Wimbrough, William, appraisement | Windom, George | Young, Francis

Marriages
  • Marriages to 1699
  • Marriage Bonds 1784-1785
  • Marriage licenses and Bonds 1787-1788; 1790-1791; 1792-1798
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Deeds, Estates, 1729-1737
  • Deeds and Wills 1729-1737
Miscellaneous
  • Curtis, William, LWT (transcript)
  • Scarburgh, Mary, Mrs., LWT (1691) (transcript)
  • 1896 Minute Book

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Monday, July 17, 2017

Images of Alleghany County VA Wills, Estates, Marriages #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet


Alleghany County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages

Alleghany County, Virginia

Alleghany County is located on the far western edge of Commonwealth of Virginia in the northernmost part of the Roanoke Region and is bordered by the Alleghany Mountains. The county was created in 1822 from parts of Botetourt, Bath and Monroe Counties (now in West Virginia). The county seat is Covington. 

Alleghany County Wills and Estates available to members of Virginia Pioneers 

Marriages
  • 1854 to 1916
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Inventories, Estates 1822 to 1837
  • Wills, Inventories, Estates 1837 to 1849
  • Wills, Inventories, Estates 1849 to 1876
Images of Wills, Inventories and Estates 1833 to 1837

Names of Testators: Andrews, Adam | Byrd, Thomas | Dawson, James | Douglas, Benjamin | Diessler, Elizabeth | Fisk, John | Fudge, Mary | Galloway, Benjamin | Glasburn, David | Haggard, Adam | Haggard, David | Hagn, Jennell | Hale, John Sr. | Hansbarger, John | Herbert, William | Hook, Daniel | Humphries, William | Kean, David | Keyser, David | Kimberlin, Catharine | Kimberlin, James | Kimberlin, Mary | Kimberlin, Michael | Kincaid, Andrew | Kincaid, John | Kincaid, Robert | Knox, William | Lewis, John | Lewis, Joseph | Lively, George | Mallon, Michael | Mann, John | Mann, Sarah | McCall, Thomas | McCallister, John | McCallister, Thomas | Merry, James | Merry, Mary | Milhollin, Patrick | Miller, Daniel | Morris, Archibald | Moyer, Catharine | Moyers, George | Neel, John | Nicely, Jacob | Persinger, Henry | Persinger, Moses | Pilyer, George | Pitzer, Abraham | Pitzer, Bernard | Robinson, James | Skeen, Jonathan | Smith, William | Steele, George Sr. | Taylor, Hugh | Taylor, William | Wallace, Michael | Wayt, George | Wayt, Mary | Webb, John | Wolf, John | Wolf, Mary | Wright, Jane Wright, Vincent 

Images of Wills 1837 to 1849

Names of Testators: Armontrout, Frederick | Armontrout, George | Avill, Michael | Beals, Charles | Blinton, John | Booth, William | Bradish, James | Bryan, Hugh | Callaghan, Margaret Carpenter, Samuel Sr. | Carson, John | Daggs, Hezekiah | Deeds, John | Dew, Lucy | Dew, William | Dickson, Lot | Erwin, Samuel | Findley, George | Fudge, Conrad | Griffith, Robert | Haden, Matthew | Hansburger, Jacob | Harmon, Peter | Jackson, Abel | Keyser, Keziah | Kimbelton, Nancy | Kimberlin, Mary | Kincaid, Angelina | Kincaid, Archibald M. | Kincaid, Robert M. | Kincaid, William D. | Kindle, James | Lane, Mary | Lassiter, John | Leighton, John | Lemon, Conrad | Lively, George | Lively, Harrison | Lively, Jonathan | Lockhart, David | Mallon or Mallow, Christina | Mallon, Michael | Massie, Henry | Mayfair, Henry | McAllister, Thomas | Morrison, David | Payne, Charles C. | Pennel, Joseph | Persinger, Jacob Sr. | Persinger, James | Pitzer, Abraham | Quickel, Henry | Reynolds, James | Reynolds, John | Richardson, John | Sanders, Thomas | Scott, Andrew M. | Scott, A. W. | Scott, Elizabeth | Scott, George | Scott, Michael | Simmons, Ephraim | Skeen, William | Starnes, Jacob | Taylor, James M. | Way, Charles | Williams, H. | Williams, John | Wolf, George | Wolf, Jacob | Wolf, Sampson 

Images of Wills, Estates, Inventories 1849 to 1876

Names of Testators: Allen, John | Anitt, James | Armortrout, Catharine | Armstrong, William R. | Avitt, Joanna | Beaver, Jane | Beck, Richard | Bennett, Jacob | Bennet, William | Bowzer, David | Bowzer, John | Brown, Samuel | Callaghan, Charles | Carson, George | Carson, John Jr. | Cassidy, Mary | Clark, William J. | Clark, William L. | Cosley, Martin | Cowan, Jonas | Crow, Amanda | Dagg, Catharine | Dawson, Joseph Denshoo, John | Dickey, L. D. | Dresebell, Peter | Durber, Levi | Findley, John | Fridley, Thomas | Fudge, Conrad | Fudge, Martha | Gibbons, William | Gilbert, David A. | Gilliland, Henry | Given, David | Groce, Jacob | Hammond, G. W., Dr. | Hansbarger, Jacob | Hansbarger, John H. | Hansbarger, Sebastian | Hardy, John | Harmon, Anthony | Harmon, Christopher | Harmon, George H. | Harmon, George W. | Harmon, Henry | Harris, Henry | Harrison, Joseph | Havitt, Joanna | Hefter, Joseph | Hepler, David | Heplin, John | Howes, George P. | Hook, Stephen | Humphries, Jesse | Humphries, Oliver | Jackson, Andrew G. | Jackson, Crofferd | Jackson, Jesse J. | Jennell, Mamith | Johnson, Bernard | Johnson, William | Kaines, William | Karnes, Michael | Karnes, Sampson | Kean, Samuel | Keyes, John D. Keyser, Andrew J. | Keyser, Fleming | Keyser, Keziah | Kimberlin, Joseph | Kincaid, Andrew | Kincaid, Mary C. | Kincaid, Samuel | King, George P. | King, William F. | Kyle, Galbraith | Lemon, Joseph | Lewis, John | Lively, Joseph | Lockhart, Elizabeth | Mallow, John | Mann, Moses H. | Martin, George | Martin, John | Martin, William F. | Mathews, James | McCallister, Thompson | Meyer, Augustus | Meyers, George | Moon, John | Morter, William | Niceley, Elizabeth | Niceley, Lenis | Nidas, Chapman | Nidas, D. J. | Pender, Michael | Persinger, A. | Persinger, Henry | Plymale, William | Putnam, Eli | Quickler, Adam | Reece, Emanuel | Robinson, Elizabeth | Robinson, James F.| Robinson, John S. | Rucker, Francis | Scott, William | Sevily, Elizabeth | Sheen, William | Schumacker, William | Shell, James | Shell, Jonathan | Simpson, John | Skeen, Robert Sr. | Smith, Henry | Smith, Jennet | Smith, John | Smith, John | Steele, Isaac | Stone, John | Stringer, John | Stull, Daniel | Stull, George Sr. | Stull, James | Tinsley, Bennet | Vance, William | Ward, John | Warren, James | Weaver, John | Whitten, William | Wiley, Ferdinand | Williamson, David | Wolf, John | Wolf, Abraham | Wolf, Jacob H. | Wolf, Mary Elizabeth | Wolf, Mary 

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