Thursday, December 8, 2016

Irish and Scottish Emigrants to Virginia #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net


Irish and Scottish Emigrants 

Wilderness RoadEarly during the 18th century, Irish and Scottish emigrants, suffering from high rents and poverty, began to leave their countries to find a better life in America. The stop-over in Pennsylvania was Berks and Bucks Counties. The grandfather of Jefferson Davis was Evan Davis. Evan had a brother who settled in Augusta County in 1730. (His son was the of the Rockingham County, Virginia Militia during the Revolutionary War). About the same time, Edward Hall migrated from Ireland into Augusta County in 1736. He was married to the daughter of Archibald Stuart who migrated from Scotland to Pennsylvania. Another irishman, Beavis Shirey placed himself in bondage to come to America in 1775. He was a gunmaker from Bristol and boarded the ship Baltimore which left London in June. After landing, he traveled down through the Shenandoah Valley into Augusta County, Virginia. 
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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

The Birthplace of George Washington #history #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

The Birth Place of George Washington

Birthplace of George WashingtonGeorge Washington was born February 22, 1732 in an old-fashioned Virginia farm house, near the Potomac River, on what was known as Bridge's Creek Plantation. The house had four rooms on the ground floor, with an attic of long sloping roofs and an enormous brick chimney at each end. His father was a wealthy planter, owning more than 5000 acres of land land in four counties, some of which were on the banks of the Rappahannock River, this latter location because he had money invested in iron-mines. To this plantation the family removed when George was seven years old, the new home being nearly opposite the small village of Fredericksburg. George was sent to a field school and taught by a man named Hobby, a sexton of the church and tenant of the father of George. The taught subjects were reading, writing, and ciphering. It was not until later in life that George perfected his penmanship. When George was eleven years old his father died, leaving to him the home where they lived on the Rappahannock, and to his brother Lawrence the great plantation on the Potomac afterward called "Mount Vernon". George received his home training from his mother. Fortunate, indeed, was he to have such a mother to teach him; for she was kind, firm, and had a strong practical sense. She loved her son, and he deeply appreciated her fond care of him. Some of George's youthful letters to his mother are full of interest. After the manner of the time he addressed her formally as "Honored Madam,&quoy; and signed himself "Your dutiful son." Lawrence also played an important part in shaping his character. As was the custom, the eldest son inherited the bulk of the estate of his father and was sent to a school in England to receive the training which would fit him to be a gentleman and a leader in social life. Thus, Lawrence returned from England as a cultured young man with fine manners and well fitted to be a man of affairs to help influence his younger brother, now seven or eight years of age. Soon after the death of his father, the boy went to live with his brother Augustine on the "'Bridge Creek Plantation" which provided him the advantages of a good school. Many of his copy-books and books of exercises, containing such legal forms as receipts, bills and deeds, as well as pictures of birds and faces, have been preserved. In these books there are, also, his rules of conduct, maxims which he kept before him as aids to good behavior. George heard many stories about wars with the Indians and about troubles between the English and the French colonies. Meanwhile, his brother Lawrence served as a soldier in the West Indies in a war between England and Spain. This service inspired George to organize his boy friends into little military companies, and, acting as their commander, drilled, paraded, and led them in their sham battles in the school-yard. When he was sixteen years of age, George went to live with his brother Lawrence at "Mount Vernon" where he spent much of his time in surveying. This is where he became acquainted with Lord Fairfax of "Belvoir" plantation. This warm friendship soon had a practical turn. Lord Fairfax owned an immense tract of country in the Shenandoah Valley Some said that this land comprized one-fifth the size of the present State of Virginia. Lord Fairfax decided to send George into this wild region of the Blue Ridge Mountains to report to him something about the lands there. Thus, during March of 1748, George Washington set out with the eldest son of the cousin of Lord Fairfax to travel on horseback through a forest of some of 100 miles before they reached the Shenandoah Valley. They carried guns in their hands, for until their return about a month later they would have to depend mainly upon hunting for their supply of food. After reaching the wild country they had to live in the most primitive fashion. For instance, Washington tells of a night inside the cabin of a woodsman who had nothing but a mat of straw for his bed and a single blanket for cover which was alive with vermin. He wrote in his diary: "I made a promise to sleep so no more, choosing rather to sleep in the open air before the fire." Again, in a letter to a friend, he says: "I have not slept above three or four nights in a bed, but, after walking a good deal all day, I have lain down before the fire upon a little hay, straw, fodder, or a bear-skin, with man, wife and children, like dogs and cats; and happy is he who gets the berth nearest the fire." Once they fell in with a war-party of painted warriors who gathered about a huge fire built under the trees. As the great logs blazed in the midst of the dark forest, the Indians joined in one of their wild, weird dances. They leaped to and fro, whooped and shrieked like mad beings, while one of their companions thumped upon a drum made by drawing a deer-skin across a pot filled with water, and another rattled a gourd containing shot and decorated with a horse's tail. It was a strange experience which these two youths had that month. But Washington was well paid, earning from $7 to $21 a day. On the return of the young surveyor to Mount Vernon his employer, Lord Fairfax, was so much pleased with the report that he secured his appointment as public surveyor. For the next three years George lived the life of a surveyor, spending much of his time with Lord Fairfax at his wilderness home, "Greenway Court", near Winchester. Soon thereafter, Governor Dinwiddie of Virginia, appointed him to the rank of major in the State militia. Some two years afterward his brother Lawrence died and left the "Mount Vernon" estate to his daughter, with George Washington as guardian. And upon her death, a little later, Washington became owner of the immense plantation at Mount Vernon, and hence a wealthy man. 

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Immigrants to Augusta Co. VA #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

The Origins of Immigrants to Augusta County 

bateauThe Scotch-Irish cut a trail from Pennsylvania down through the Shenandoah Valley and into the region of Augusta County. During 1732, sixteen families from Pennsylvania crossed the Potomac and settled near the present town of Winchester. Joist Hite settled upon a land grant of 40,000 acres in the valley which had been acquired by Isaac Vanmeter and his brother from the Governor of Virginia. John Lewis, an immigrant from Ulster, Ireland who had waited for his family to join him from Europe, joined this group. The genealogist might do well to search the Burke and Berk Counties, Pennsylvania records first, while assuming that the earliest settlers came from Ulster and Antrim, Ireland. Source: History of Augusta County, Virginia. 

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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Images of Augusta Co. VA Wills, Estates, Tax Records #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Augusta County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills and Estates


Staunton, Virginia

The county seat is Staunton, Virginia. Augusta County was formed in 1738 from Orange County; it was named after the Princess of Wales, Augusta (of Saxe-Gotha), mother of King George III of the United Kingdom. Originally, Augusta County was a vast territory with an indefinite western boundary and this explains why the genealogist locates a vast supply of records in this early county and why research should include that the States of West Virginia and Kentucky were taken from it. Some of the earliest settlers were: Jean Bohanan (from France), John Bumgarner, William Cowden, Robert Crockett and Peter Cotner.

Augusta County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Digital Images of Augusta County Wills 1745 to 1753
Testators: Ahres, Simon; Anderson, Isaac ;Baxter, Andrew ;Bell, James ;Bohanan, Jean ;Boyd, Andrew; Brock, Rudal ;Bumgarner, John ;Campbell, Gilbert ;Clendening, Archibald ;Cook, Patrick Cotner, Peter Cowden, William ;Crocket, Robert ;Crockett, Samuel; Cumberland, John ;Davison, Robert ;Denniston, Daniel ;Dobikin, John; Fulton, James ;Galaghar, Charles ;Gibson, Daniel ;Goldman, Jacob ;Griffie, Mathusalem; Hays, John ;Hill, William ;Hodge, Elizabeth ;James, William ;Jamison, William;Johnson, John; King, Robert; Kirkham, Robert ;Lusk, Nathan ;Magill, William ;McKay, Robert Sr. ;McCleary, Alexander ;Moore, Andrew ;Moore, David ;Noble, John;Patterson, John ;Reese, Thomas ;Robison, James ;Rothgab, John Jacob ;Ruddle, John Jr. ;Rutledge, John; Scott, James ;Sayers, Robert ;Scott, Samuel ;Sharp, Mathew ;Thorn, Henry ;Thompson, Mathew ;Wiley, John ;Woodley, John
Index to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills, Deeds, Inventories 1745 to 1753
Miscellaneous Wills and Estates
  • Askew, Thomas (1815)
  • Burkett, Nathaniel (1813)
  • Lyle, John (1758)
  • Macky, John (1773)
  • Millsaps, Thomas (1759)
  • Piper, Daniel (1823)
  • Rankin, Richard (1796)
  • Runkle, Samuel (1802)
Tax Records
  • Property Books 1782 to 1787
  • Property Books 1820 to 1827
  • Property Books 1836-1860
  • Property Books 1876-1879
  • Property Books 1881 to 1900
  • Property Books (Staunton) 1802, 1804-1807

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Monday, December 5, 2016

Sir Edmund Coke #history #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet


Sir Edmund Coke and Friends
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Sir Edmund Coke The term "gentleman" given by Sir Edmund Coke of England distinguished persons who were not entitled to a coat-of arms. Nevertheless, it appears that a substantial number of persons legally entitled to display coats-of-arms on deeds and other documents was in wide use by at least forty-seven families who resided in Essex, Lancaster and Middlesex Counties. In other words, the descendants of ancient nobility who were not the eldest son and thus did not inherit the family seat, became adventurers to the plantations. An examination of 17th century court house documents reveals the impression of the family "seal". In fact, those adventurers occupying the highest positions in the Colony were natives of England. Just as families of the same rank in England acknowledged the leading families in the surrounding shires, the prominent families of Virginia were well acquainted with the social antecedents of each other in the Mother Country. Before departing England, some of the emigrants took care to have their coats-of-arms confirmed. In 1633, Moore Fauntleroy obtained such a confirmation from the Office of the English Heralds, who reported that this coat-of-arms had been enjoyed by the Fauntleroys "time out of mind." Source: Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Vol. I, page 224.


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Sunday, December 4, 2016

Images of Orange Co. VA Wills, Estates, Marriages #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Orange County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Maps, Virginia Probate Records


Barboursville

Orange County was created in 1738 from Augusta County, Virginia. It was named in honor of William, the Prince of Orange, who in that year married Anne, Princess Royal of England. Orange County is known as having been the largest Virginia county ever formed. Orange covered a vast territory extending from its present eastern boundary west to the Mississippi River and north to the Great Lakes. The states of Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and West Virginia were once part of Orange County.

Orange County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Marriages
  • Original Marriage Bonds 1775 to 1786 (no index)
  • Original Marriage Bonds 1787 to 1791 (no index)
Maps

1736 Beverley Patent (map of names)

Miscellaneous Records
  • Marriages 1747-1810 (Watson to Waugh)
  • Deed Books 1, 2 (1735-8), 2 misc. pages
  • Deed Book 3, (3 misc. pages)
  • Deed Book 20, 1 misc. page
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills and Inventories 1735 to 1744
  • Index to Wills and Inventories 1744 to 1778
Digital Images of Wills 1735 to 1744 
Names of Testators: Calvert, John | Curtiss, Mary | Griffin, John | Hanslee, Samuel | Jennings, John | Kanady, John | Lightfoot, John | Mallory, Roger | Naylor, Ann | Nicholas, John | Perkins, Elisha | Rhodes, William | Rucker, John | Rucker, Peter | Smith, Augustus | Smith, Elizabeth | Smith, William | Spotswood, Alexander | Stanton, Thomas | Strother, Jeremiah | Watts, Robert

Digital Images of Wills 1744 to 1748 
Testators: Banks, Girard | Barnett, John | Beale, Elizabeth | Beale, Richard | Beale, Taverner | Beasley, Bennett | Bell, Roger | Bohannon, Duncan | Boston, John | Bradburn, Sarah | Bradbourne, William | Bramham, John | Brockman, John | Brockman, Samuel | Brown, Daniel | Bryson, John | Burk, Philip | Bush, John | Campbell, Thomas | Campbell, William | Carpenter, William W. C. | Catlett, John | Cave, Benjamin | Cave, David | Cavenaugh, Philemon | Chiles, Anna | Chiles, Malachi | Coleman, James | Collins, John | Cox, William | Coyne, Edward | Coyne, Elizabeth | Crosthwart, Timothy | Davis, Berreman | Dawson, Robert | Deering, Richard | Duglass, Robert | Earley, John | Easlin, Philip | Embry, William | Eve, Joseph | Faulker, William | Finleson, John | Fleet, Weedom | Frazier, Alexander | George, Samuel | Goodall, Charles | Gore, John | Green, Robert | Hansford, Charles | Harper, Samuel | Harris, Esther | Hawkins, Moses | Hawkins, William | Hughes, Thomas Sr. | Jackson, Thomas | James, Samuel | Johnson, William | Jones, John | Ker, Jacob | Kindel, William | Lathom, John | Lindon, Benjamin | Lucas, John | Lucas, William | Mallory, John | Managham, Daniel | Martain, Henry | McHenry, John | Merry, Thomas | Monroe, William | Moore, Bernard | Morton, William | Pettey, John | Plunkett, John | Pollard, William | Porter, Benjamin | Powell, James | Powell, Simon | Pratt, William | Price, Ayalon | Rhodes, Hezekiah | Riddel, William | Roach, James | Rolen, Edward | Shillern, William | Sisson, Bryan | Smith, Ambrose | Smith, Edward | Sneidor, Henry | Spicer, Ranaser | Stephens, William | Strothers, Sarah | Taylor, Hancock | Taylor, Martha | Thomas, Joseph | Turbervile, Sarah | Walker, Thomas | Walls, Esther | Webb, Milley | Willheit, Michael | Williams, Francis | Wisdom, John | Woolfolk, Joseph | Zimmerman, Christopher 

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Saturday, December 3, 2016

Pounds Sterling #history #virginiapioneers.net

Pounds Sterling


pounds sterlingAn Act was passed in 1633 requiring that all contracts and bargains should be kept in money sterling and not in tobacco, which was the custom at that time. A large proportion of these sales were based on credit in anticipation of the next year's crop. In the course of time, however, prices could drop rather dramatically, leaving the planter with a heavy loss. Business has always had it risks and the planters also took their chances. The idea was to make a better world than the one they'd left. Property was conveyed as collateral. In the event that the debt was not settled in a timely manner (when the tobacco crop was in), the merchant or creditor could take possession of the landed property. If the crop were sufficient to pay the debt, the planter could claim a release in full.

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Friday, December 2, 2016

Images of Isle of Wight Co. VA Wills, Estates, Marriages #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Isle of Wight County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Court House Records


old court house
History: In 1662, the site of Patesfield was selected for a new town. As an inducement to build on these sites, a lot, half an acre in extent, was granted in fee simple to any one on condition of erecting a residence and store on it, this conveyance being subject to the additional condition that the beneficiary should pay one hundred pounds to the county. In 1698, Robert Scot willed the whole amount of the sums due him by different persons, in the form of tobacco or coin, to indigent persons in Isle of Wight County. The only persons allowed to furnish friendly Indians with match-coats, hoes and axes were such as had been nominated by the county courts and the right of absolute free trade was granted to the Indian population on the Eastern Shore. As a result, certain places were appointed as public marts, to which the Indians who were at peace with the white were invited to come at a specified time. These marts were situated in Henrico, Isle of Wight, New Kent, Rappahannock, Lancaster, Stafford, Accomack and Northampton Counties.

Sources: Records of Lower Norfolk County (1695-1703), page 123; Hening's Statues, vol. II, pp. 337, 350, 351, 403; Virginia in the Seventeenth Century, Vol. II, by Philip Alexander Bruce.

Marriages
  • Marriages (found in Gates County, North Carolina Marriages
  • Marriages 1774, 1793-1794, 1800
Transcripts and Abstracts of Wills and Estates

Bennett, Robert (1603 LWT)
Brantley, Edward (1739 estate)
Clark, Humphrey (1656), LWT
Cobbs, Joseph (1653), LWT
Cooper, Justinian, LWT
Dunster, Robert (1656), LWT
Gent, John (1728)
Hardy, John, LWT
Elijah Holland, LWT (1857)
Holland, Job, transcript of LWT (1789)
Jewry, William, LWT
Jones, Anthony, LWT
Pitt, Thomas, LWT
Pitt, William, LWT
Reynolds, Christopher, LWT
Rows, John (1734)
Smith, Arthur, LWT
Sugars, John (1726), transcript
Taberner, Joshua, LWT
Valentine, John, LWT
Watson, Robert, LWT
Wilmoth, Edward, LWT

Digital Images of Wills 1794 to 1803

Adkins, Simon
Allen, William
Applewhaite, Arthur
Athens, John
Ballard, Sally
Bankley, Joshua
Battin, Samuel
Blaney, David Boon, Radcliff Bowzer, James
Brewer, John
Bridger, Ann
Bryant, William
Clark, Joseph
Coggins, Catherine
Copher, Christian
Cutchin, Polly
Darden, Dempsey
Darden, John
Daugherty, Mary
Dixon, Thomas
Duck, Joseph
Edwards, Aaron
Edwards, Elizabeth
Edwards, Robert
Edwards, Solomon
Floyd, Samuel
Fowler, James
Giles, John Sr.
Godwin, Henry Bert
Godwin, Joseph
Gray, Nathaniel
Haile, Hannah
Hamilton, William
Harris, Matthew
Harrison, John, estate
Holland, Robert
Hollowell, William
Holmes, Joseph
Hunt, James
Hutchins, Jesse
Johnson, Lazarus
Johnson, Michael
Jordan, Lewis
Mitchell, James
Moody, William
Norsworthy, Elizabeth
Pierce, William
Pitt, James
Saunders, Elizabeth
Smelley, William
Smith, Thomas
Spicey, Joseph
Stallings, Joseph
Taylor, Charles B.
Taylor, Richard
Thomas, John
Tomlin, Nicholas
Tynes, Benjamin
Tynes, Thomas
Underwood, Anne
Underwood, Sampson
Vellines, Twaits
Watkins, Sarah
Webb, Anne
West, James
Whitley, Nathan
Willis, Miles
Wilson, Solomon
Wombwell, Mary
Woodward, William
Wrenn, Josiah
Wrenn, Thomas
Young, Elizabeth

Digital Images of Wills 1804 to 1808

Atkins, Susanna Beale, James
Boykin, Thomas Sr.
Brazey, Campion
Bund, Amelia
Chapman, Allen
Chapman, Richard
Daughtry, Richard
Davis, Isham
Downing, James
Driver, Dolphia
Edward, John
Eley, Robert
Flake, Micajah
Fulgham, Charles
Gay, William Sr.
Godwin, Bartlett
Hutchins, Moses
Johnson, Thomas
Nevill, Amey
Parnell, Elizabeth
Pell, Henry
Price, George
Shivers, Jonas
Smith, Susannah
Tallows, James Sr.
Turner, Mary
Turner, Unity
Tynes, Charles
Vaughan, Zilpha
Villines, John
West, John Pitt
West, Priscilla Pitt
Whitley, Jesse
Whitley, Julia
Wilson, Sampson 

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Thursday, December 1, 2016

Nathaniel Bacon Fights for Freedom #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net


Nathaniel Bacon, the Rebel

Bacon's CastleNathaniel Bacon, a wealthy planter from Suffolk, England and kinsman of the famous Sir Francis Bacon, was by marriage related to Governor Berkeley, the colonial governor. Bacon arrived in Virginia during 1674. He was financed by his father and acquired two estates along the James River. The main plantation was located some 40 miles above Jamestown and was described as an average size manor house, with an old and new hall, inner room over the hall and outer room. The chamber of Mrs. Bacon was included, as well as a kitchen, dairy and storeroom. The second plantation was located in the vicinity of Richmond, Virginia. 

Because his wife was a cousin of the governor and owing to his influential social and family background, Bacon was soon appointed to the governor's council where he readily endorsed a policy to remove all Indians from the region. The plan was to expand the territory. But, most of all, put an end to the Indian attacks along the frontier settlements. Berkeley was opposed. He feared a general Indian war such as the massacre of 1622/3 when the Indians set out to kill all white men on the continent. Also, Berkeley was concerned for trade with Native Americans, and desired to avoid the costs of a major conflict,. Hence, he took no action. 

But as settlers continously suffered the atrocities of the raids and murders near the settlements, Bacon became impatient. Therefore, in 1676 he organized an expedition against the Indians. From the start the governor branded Bacon a rebel, but was soon forced by public pressure to give Bacon a commission. Later, Berkeley changed his mind and once again declared Bacon as a rebel and took the drastic action of sending several military expeditions against Bacon and his 60 odd rebels. This unfortunate action resulted in the burning of Jamestown! Bacon then managed to seize control of the government for a time and called an assembly to repeal low tobacco price scales and high taxes. 

However, during the height of his power in late 1676, Bacon died of fever, and the rebellion collapsed. Actually, Nathaniel Bacon dared to reform a bad situation in the colony arising out of a privileged English aristocracy when he addressed the colonial grievances of the times. The unpopular Governor Berkeley was recalled to England and another sent to replace him. Bacon was the first rebel reformer in the colony and has been described as a forerunner of the American Revolution.

Source: Records of York County, vol. 1690-1694. The Bacon genealogy is traced and available to members of Virginia Pioneers. 
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