Monday, September 18, 2017

Louisa Co. VA Genealogies and Histories #virginiapioneersnet

Louisa County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Court House Records


Ferncliff, Virginia

Louisa County was created in 1742 from Hanover County, Louisa County and was named for Princes Louise of Great Britain, the youngest daughter of King George II and the wife of King Frederick V of Denmark. Patrick Henry was known to have resided in Louisa County for a short time on Roundabout Creek. Thomas Johnson was a representative of Louisa County in the House of Burgesses. Patrick Henry established himself as an eloquent lawyer and won his first election in 1765 and represented Louisa County. 

Louisa County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Marriages
  • Marriages 1757 to 1856
Digital Images of Wills 1745 to 1766
  • Belscher, Patrick
  • Buckner, Philip
  • Clark, Christopher
  • Cosby, John
  • Fleming, Robert
  • Harris, Benjamin
  • Johnson, John
  • Kimbro, William
  • Lea, Francis
  • Mackalester, William
  • Meriwether, Francis
  • Moorman, Elizabeth
  • Sumter, William
  • Terrill, Richard
  • Waddy, Samuel
  • Woodall, James
  • Yancy, Archelaus
Digital Images of Wills 1767 to 1783
  • Anderson, David
  • Anderson, Pouncey
  • Arnett, James
  • Barrett, Charles
  • Belscher, Judy
  • Bibb, Benjamin Sr.
  • Bourn, William
  • Bunch, Samuel
  • Byars, John
  • Carr, John
  • Carr, John (2)
  • Carr, Samuel
  • Christmass, John
  • Chiles, John
  • Clark, Francis
  • Clark, Joseph
  • Cory, Edward
  • Cosby, David
  • Davis, John
  • Dickenson, Charles
  • East, Joseph
  • Fernham, Robert
  • Garland, Nathaniel
  • Garrett, William
  • Gooch, William
  • Glynn, Jeremiah
  • Hall, John
  • Hall, John
  • Henderson, Joseph
  • Henson, Richard
  • Hester, Robert
  • Hunter, Andrew
  • Jackson, William
  • Jones, Richard
  • Jones, Richard (2)
  • Jordan, Francis
  • Kingfield, Robert
  • Laurance, Elizabeth
  • Laurance, Henry
  • Lea, Ann
  • Lipscomb, Thomas
  • Lowry, William
  • McCullock, Elizabeth
  • Moore, John
  • Parish, Jolley
  • Paulet, Thomas
  • Pettus, John
  • Poindexter, Christian
  • Smith, Charles
  • Smith, James Jr.
  • Statham, Love
  • Tait, John
  • Tate, James
  • Terrill, Richmond
  • Terry, James
  • Thomason, George
  • Thomson, Thomas
  • Thomson, Wilson
  • Trumyear, William
  • Venable, Abraham
  • Waddy, Mary
  • Wadkins, John
  • Whitlock, Thomas
  • Woodleif, Catherine
  • Wright, Richard
  • Yancey, Robert
Miscellaneous
  • Sims, William-Last Will and Testament

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Monday, September 11, 2017

Loudoun Co. VA Genealogies and Histories #virginiapioneersnet

Loudoun County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Minute Books


Oatlands Plantation

Loudoun County was created in 1757 from Fairfax County and was named after John Campbell, the Fourth Earl of Loudoun and Governor of Virginia from 1756 to 1759. Between 1720 and 1730 settlers were Quakers, Scots-Irish, Germans and others who removed south from Pennsylvania and Maryland into Virginia. 

Loudoun County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers 

Wills Loudoun County Wills abstracts (1761-1774) 

Minute Books
  1. 1780 to 1783 (no index)
  2. 1785 to 1786 | Index
  3. 1785 to 1788


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Monday, September 4, 2017

Lee Co. VA Genealogy Records and Histories #virginiapioneersnet

Lee County, Virginia Genealogy, Deeds and Probate Records


Lynchburg, Virginia
Lee county was formed in 1793 from Russell County. It was named after Light Horse Harry Lee, the Governor of Virginia from 1791 to 1794. It was during the Revolutionary War that Lee became famous for his exploits as a leader of the Light Troops. Also, Lee was the father of the Robert E. Lee, the famous Confederate General beloved by all Virginians. In 1814, parts of Lee County, Russell County, and Washington county were combined to form Scott County. Also, in 1856, parts of Lee County, Russell County, and Scott County were combined to form Wise county. The county seat is Jonesville, Virginia.

Lee Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Digital Images of Some Deeds

Baker, Andrew
Baker, Andrew to William Ely
Ball, John
Blackmore, John
Briance, William to Josiah Dozier
Byers, William
Dickinson, Daniel to Thomas Warren
Dougherty, William
Dozier, Josiah to Isaac Craig
Dozier Josiah to Sion Minton
Ely, John to Thomas Ely
Ely, William
Fletcher, John
Gibson, Robert
Hix, James
Jones, Frederick to Thomas Warren
Lee
McMillan, James
Patrick, Robert
Sharpe, Benjamin
Sions, Francis
Slaughter, Samuel
Stone, Hiram
Vandeventer, John 

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Sunday, September 3, 2017

Finding the Path Across the Genealogy Maze #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy


Finding the Path Across the Genealogy Maze 

mazeHave you ever worked one of the maze puzzles in the Altheimer's books? Once inside the maze, the idea is to find a path out. Actually, it is a good exercize for the researcher who spends years attempting to solve complicated genealogies. We expect to find marriage records, for example, but discover that many county records did not begin requiring this filing until the 1900s. But we are inside the maze and must pause to examine all of the possibilities of exit. In seeking the obvious exit, we miss tiny details whih lead to answers. For example, did you realize that the people buried in the old part of a cemetery are "the neighborhood?" It is these tombstones which provide answers. Had you researched the local deed records, wills and estates, you might recognize some of the names. In other words, you are looking at the neighbors, friends and relatives of your ancestors. A closer look at the old section might turn up the husband's of daughters. Look closely and write down everyone's name. Notice when they include a maiden name. Example: Mary Jones Smith. Gosh, Mary's parents are probably buried close by. And an examination of old wills and estates might help identify if Mary Jones belongs to your family. Thus, just as we examine every outlet in the maze, we identify every possible relationship.   Spotsylvania County VA Genealogy Resources

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Monday, August 28, 2017

Sir Edmund Coke and Friends #virginiapioneersnet #virginiagenealogy #history

Sir Edmund Coke and Friends 

Sir Edmund CokeThe term "gentleman" given by Sir Edmund Coke of England distinguished persons who were not entitled to a coat-of arms. Nevertheless, it appears that a substantial number of persons legally entitled to display coats-of-arms on deeds and other documents was in wide use by at least forty-seven families who resided in Essex, Lancaster and Middlesex Counties. In other words, the descendants of ancient nobility who were not the eldest son and thus did not inherit the family seat, became adventurers to the plantations. An examination of 17th century court house documents reveals the impression of the family "seal". In fact, those adventurers occupying the highest positions in the Colony were natives of England. Just as families of the same rank in England acknowledged the leading families in the surrounding shires, the prominent families of Virginia were well acquainted with the social antecedents of each other in the Mother Country. Before departing England, some of the emigrants took care to have their coats-of-arms confirmed. In 1633, Moore Fauntleroy obtained such a confirmation from the Office of the English Heralds, who reported that this coat-of-arms had been enjoyed by the Fauntleroys "time out of mind." Source: Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Vol. I, page 224. Lancaster County VA Genealogies and Histories

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Friday, August 25, 2017

Names of Earliest Settlers to Essex County VA; Images of Oldest Wills & Estates 1692-1792; 1764 Passengers on the "Charmiing Molly" #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Names of Earliest Settlers on this Map 

Map of First Plantations in Essex CountyThis map depicts the locations of the first settlers to Essex County, viz: Dangerfield, Layton, Payne, Garnet, Smith, Lowry, Young, Hill and Bowler. Tappahannock was a large community of these settlers. Henry Aubrey established his plantation on Hodgkins Creek (later Hoskins Creek) where he raised hogs, cattle and sheep. Upon his death in 1694, he left much of the cattle to servants, and 700 acres to his son, Richard Aubrey on Hodgkins Creek. He lived the typical life of a planter in Essex County, of feather beds, fine linen and a silver tankard which he bequeathed to his wife. Also, there were orchard buildings to accommodate fruit crops. 

The images of the earliest wills are available to members of Virginia Pioneers Also, the Wills and Estates probated from 1692 to 1695 were the following first settlers: Henry Awbrey, Elizabeth Browne, Thomas Cooper, Richard Holt, Martin Johnson, John Jones, Thomas Pettit, Griffin Roberts, John Smith, John Waters and Thomas Williamson. More Wills and Estates were recently added dating from 1717 to 1721; 1722 to 1730.  Map of Earliest Settlers to Essex County

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:
  • Virginia: Essex County Wills and Estates 1692-95; 1717-21; 1722-30; 1775-85; 1786-92
  • 1764 Passenger List on the "Charming Molly" to Essex County
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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Accomack Wills & Estates 1671 to 1737 added; Marriages 1784-98 added to Virginia Pioneers.net #genealogy

VirginiaPioneers.net has just added images of wills and estates in Accomack County, Virginia, 1671 to 1737.  Also, marriage bonds and licenses 1784 to 1798. And tithables 1674 to 1694. The reason to search tithables is because in colonial Virginia the General Assembly collected a poll tax on all free males, servants and slaves. The information in those records help to affirm the presence of your ancestors and the numbers of persons in his family. To see a list of other Virginia records please go to Virginia Pioneers





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Monday, August 21, 2017

Clerics from England #virginiapioneersnet #virginiagenealogies

Clerics from England

St. Mary le TowerRev. Benjamin Doggett came from Ipswich, England to Virginia during the middle of the 17th century. He was a minister in Lancaster County and died in 1682. His baptism of Benjamin Doggett is recorded in the Register of St. Mary-le-Tower Church in Ipswich, Suffolk. Benjamin was the youngest of six children of William Doggett, serving as a church warden when Benjamin was born. Otherwise, he was a merchant of Woolen and other fabrics in Ipswich. According to the records of St. Johns College and the University of Cambridge, Benjamin attended a private school in Westminster (London) and his headmaster was Mr. Crouch. In 1654 He was admitted to St. John's College, University of Cambridge and was matriculated on 7 April 1655. Source: Origins (of first settlers) available to members of Virginia Pioneers. 

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Monday, August 14, 2017

Nomini Hall in Lancaster Co. VA #virginiapioneersnet #virginiagenealogy

Nomini Hall

Nomini HallRobert Carter, the owner of Nomini Hall, was the scion of one of the wealthiest and most influential Tidewater families. His great-grandfather, John Carter, emigrated to Virginia from England in 1649 and acquired 13,500 acres. John Carter established his home Corotomon in the Northern Neck, situated the fertile region between the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. Robert or "King" Carter, the son of the emigrant, actually eclipsed his father by expanding the family fortune, ultimately acquiring some 333,000 acres of land. Under the custom of primogeniture, Carter arranged that the bulk of his lands (including Corotoman) should go to his eldest son, John Carter II. Nevertheless, he also bequeathed substantial estates to his other sons, Robert, Landon, Charles, and George. 

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

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Monday, August 7, 2017

Lancaster Co. VA Genealogies and Histories #virginiapioneersnet

Lancaster County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages



Lancaster County Jail

Lancaster County was created in 1651 from Northumberland and York counties. 

One of the most important personal estates which came before the court of Lancaster between 1690 and 1700 was that of John Carter, Sr., valued at 2260 pounds. Smaller estates in the counties of Lancaster and Westmoreland were those of David Myles, 320 pounds, John Washington, 377 pounds and John Pritchard, 476 pounds. In the case of the latter, the personalty included debts owed him of 30 pounds and 101,307 pounds of tobacco.

Sources: Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. II, p. 236; Records of Lancaster County, Vol. 1674-1687, p. 36 and 1675-1689, orders, 8 Feb 1674. 

Lancaster County Court House Records available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Marriages
  • Marriages to 1699
Miscellaneous Estates
  • Ball, Hannah, LWT (1694) (image)
  • Cheatwood, Thomas- Inventory of Estate (1678) (image)
  • Haynes, Thomas, LWT (1679) (image)
  • King, William, LWT
  • Pinckard, James, LWT (1751)
  • Pinckard, Mary, LWT (1749)
Digital Images of Wills 1700 to 1719 

Ashford, John |Ball, Joseph | Batt, Margaret | Bostwick, Robert | Brightman, William | Burkley, Thomas | Bradley, John | Carter, Thomas | Chapman, William | Chappell, William | Chilton, George | Christian, Oliver | Clark, Nicholas | Davenport, William | Dillon, Stephen | Draper, Josias | Fox, Hanah | Garton, William | George, Nicholas | Glass, Joseph | Harrot, Thomas | Hart, John | Harvard, George | Heard, William | Hill, Job | Horton, Robert | James, Daniel | Kilgore, Peter | Ladner, Hugh | Landor, Duke | Laurie, John | Lawne, James | Lawson, Rowland | Lawne, John | Lot, Thomas | Lyne, Thomas | Margae, John | Mewzoy, David | Moore, Francis | Moore, John | Morinton, Thomas | Nash, William | Nickolson, Francis | Parfitt, Thomas | Payne, Richard | Pitman, John | Pollard, Robert | Price, Elinor | Roberson, Landers | Robinson, John | Rott, Brian | Sharp, John | Sharp, Margaret | Shaw, John | Stonum, Henry | Straton, James | Sweatman, John | Taylor, Job | Tillman, Elizabeth | Timson, Percival | Wales, Benjamin | Walis, Francis | Wells, Robert | Williams, Rodger | Wills, John | Wren, Nicholas | Wren, William | Young, Robert 

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

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