Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Those Who Came to Augusta Co. VA #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net

The Origins of Immigrants to Augusta County 

bateauThe Scotch-Irish cut a trail from Pennsylvania down through the Shenandoah Valley and into the region of Augusta County. During 1732, sixteen families from Pennsylvania crossed the Potomac and settled near the present town of Winchester. Joist Hite settled upon a land grant of 40,000 acres in the valley which had been acquired by Isaac Vanmeter and his brother from the Governor of Virginia. John Lewis, an immigrant from Ulster, Ireland who had waited for his family to join him from Europe, joined this group. The genealogist might do well to search the Burke and Berk Counties, Pennsylvania records first, while assuming that the earliest settlers came from Ulster and Antrim, Ireland. Source: History of Augusta County, Virginia. 

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Monday, February 20, 2017

A Good Deal for Bloggers. Act Now and Save Money!

A special deal for bloggers.
Since 2012, the VirginiaPioneers blog has published long lists of the names of testators in old wills and estates and other genealogical information to assist the researcher in locating ancestors.  We hope that the information is helpful.  Henceforth, we will publish every Monday, and continue to include the names of those who had wills and estates in Virginia as well as all updates to the Virginia Pioneers website,  tips, information on Virginia families, and historical articles.  To celebrate all of this hard work, Pioneer Families LLC is offering a good deal to genealogists!

If you act act now, you can have access to 8 Genealogy Websites, viz: Georgia PioneersKentucky PioneersNorth Carolina PioneersSouth Carolina PioneersVirginia PioneersSoutheastern Genealogy (Alabama and Tennessee)Georgia School Graduates from ca 1818, and Genealogy-Books for 18 months (instead of 12).  Also, bloggers may sign up for the reoccurring subscription with PayPal and always get 18 months and the same low rate.  Note: This offer will expire soon.

Subscribe here



Old Cars, and Things #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Old Cars, and Things

40 FordThis generation thinks of the old automobiles of the past as glamorous and classy. I remember when the "40 Ford" was quite popular for its easy finesse around town. It did not have the "shiny classic car look" of today. In other words, during the days of actual use, it was simply a loud, smelly, dusty vehicle which bore the brunt of wind, rain and dust. One had to be properly addressed for the occasion. The glamorization part seems to occur after a society suffers through an age of invention and industrialization and passes on its upgrades to future generations. Yet the old farms, mules, chicken coups of our ancestors is a reminder that they prepared the way, for us.  Chesterfield Co. VA Genealogies and Histories


County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Where is the Book of Remembrance? #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy #familyhistories

Where is the Book of Remembrance?

Port RoyalThe Book of Remembrance which is mentioned in the Bible was a record written by Adam. That would be the most ancient written record of mankind. Where is it? Is it hidden in the rocks or buried in the ground somewhere? Moses was aware of such a book because he transposed some of those memories into the Book of Genesis. The discoveries of ancient cities under the seas are beginning to establish real evidence of certain times, places and people who existed before sea levels were raised. Modern sonar equipment helps to define many items heretofore lost to us, such as the lay of the land. A topographical map locates old roads, rivers, and such. In other words, impressions once made in the earth are discernible. Until recently, it was generally accepted that the Egyptian sphinx and rocks at Stone Henge and in the Easter Islands sat firmly upon the earth. Until someone did some excavating. Thus, the scientific discoveries and subsequent analysis of the historical past are somewhat flawed. So it is with genealogical research. As we trace our ancestors further back in time, before the modern era and discovering written records, we have to realize that first, there is written evidence and second, that we have not found it. We cannot merely assume that ancient mankind resided in caves and used clubs to kill animals. This idea supports a flawed Darwinian theory that man started as a one-cell animal in the sea and that the apes are our ancestors. This theory fell apart when the so-called "connection" was discovered that the skull of a human and the jaw of an ape were fraudulently pieced together to prove such a theory. Unfortunately, we cannot accurately trace ourselves beyond the Domesday Book, which is the first taxation record of English commoners during 1066 A. D. What about ancient church records before that? As excavations on the earth and under the sea continue, there is hope that records may also be discovered and interpreted through the use of modern equipment. I can remember when old faded county records were no longer discernible, yet today those same records can be read with modern microfilming and camera equipment. The Dead Sea Scrolls, crumbled into small pieces and faced, are being interpreted by modern equipment at Brigham Young University. The use of DNA is quite telling when it examples old skeletons. Consider the corpse of Tutankamun. The cause of his death was a mystery for centures until the DNA experts analyzed it. When we visit old cemeteries, do we realize that the ground is filled with unmarked graves and that a closer examination of washed out areas and sinking holes should be considered. The graves of children are usually located next to the parents, but often sink into the ground and eventually disappear in the soil. Perhaps a closer examination of a family burial site is indicated. Old wills, estates, deeds and other court house records are full of clues. It is not enough to simply read the old will of the ancestor. A study of all of the wills (in the same will book as the ancestor) provides clues such as names of relatives, brides, grooms, friends and neighbors. It is the old neighborhood! These records help locate old farms and plantations, children, parents, grandparents, cousins, places or origin, and so on. Thus, the past is not really lost. We simply have further "excavate" the records to find it!  Pulaski County VA Genealogies and Histories

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Irish and Scottish Emigrants to America #history #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Irish and Scottish Emigrants 

Wilderness RoadEarly during the 18th century, Irish and Scottish emigrants, suffering from high rents and poverty, began to leave their countries to find a better life in America. The stop-over in Pennsylvania was Berks and Bucks Counties. The grandfather of Jefferson Davis was Evan Davis. Evan had a brother who settled in Augusta County in 1730. (His son was the of the Rockingham County, Virginia Militia during the Revolutionary War). About the same time, Edward Hall migrated from Ireland into Augusta County in 1736. He was married to the daughter of Archibald Stuart who migrated from Scotland to Pennsylvania. Another irishman, Beavis Shirey placed himself in bondage to come to America in 1775. He was a gunmaker from Bristol and boarded the ship Baltimorewhich left London in June. After landing, he traveled down through the Shenandoah Valley into Augusta County, Virginia. 

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Blood is Thicker than Water #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net

Blood is By Far Thicker than Water

Tinkling Spring Meeting HouseJohn Preston was the first of his family to come to America from Londonderry, Ireland. His father and uncles were Englishmen who served under King William and aided in the defense of that city when besieged by Roman Catholics commanded by King James in 1689. Preston was a protestant and married a sister of Colonel James Patton of Donnegal and removed with him from Ireland to Virginia during the year of 1740. Colonel Patton had for some years commanded a merchant ship and was a man of property and enterprise. The Colonel obtained an order from the Council from the Governor of Virginia under which he appropriated to himself and associates 120,000 acres of the best lands lying above the Blue Ridge Mountains. When Colonel Patton was killed by Indians at Smithfield in 1753, some of these lands passed on to his descendants. The first Virginia residence of John Preston was "Spring Hill" in Augusta County; thereafter, in 1743 he settled his family upon a tract of land adjoining Staunton on the north side of that town. He died shortly thereafter and was buried at Tinkling Spring Meeting House. 

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Images of Augusta Co. VA Wills, Estates, Marriages #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Augusta County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills and Estates


Staunton, Virginia

The county seat is Staunton, Virginia. Augusta County was formed in 1738 from Orange County; it was named after the Princess of Wales, Augusta (of Saxe-Gotha), mother of King George III of the United Kingdom. Originally, Augusta County was a vast territory with an indefinite western boundary and this explains why the genealogist locates a vast supply of records in this early county and why research should include that the States of West Virginia and Kentucky were taken from it. Some of the earliest settlers were: Jean Bohanan (from France), John Bumgarner, William Cowden, Robert Crockett and Peter Cotner.

Augusta County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members ofVirginia Pioneers

Digital Images of Augusta County Wills 1745 to 1753
Testators: Ahres, Simon; Anderson, Isaac ;Baxter, Andrew ;Bell, James ;Bohanan, Jean ;Boyd, Andrew; Brock, Rudal ;Bumgarner, John ;Campbell, Gilbert ;Clendening, Archibald ;Cook, Patrick Cotner, Peter Cowden, William ;Crocket, Robert ;Crockett, Samuel; Cumberland, John ;Davison, Robert ;Denniston, Daniel ;Dobikin, John; Fulton, James ;Galaghar, Charles ;Gibson, Daniel ;Goldman, Jacob ;Griffie, Mathusalem; Hays, John ;Hill, William ;Hodge, Elizabeth ;James, William ;Jamison, William;Johnson, John; King, Robert; Kirkham, Robert ;Lusk, Nathan ;Magill, William ;McKay, Robert Sr. ;McCleary, Alexander ;Moore, Andrew ;Moore, David ;Noble, John;Patterson, John ;Reese, Thomas ;Robison, James ;Rothgab, John Jacob ;Ruddle, John Jr. ;Rutledge, John; Scott, James ;Sayers, Robert ;Scott, Samuel ;Sharp, Mathew ;Thorn, Henry ;Thompson, Mathew ;Wiley, John ;Woodley, John
Index to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills, Deeds, Inventories 1745 to 1753
Miscellaneous Wills and Estates
  • Askew, Thomas (1815)
  • Burkett, Nathaniel (1813)
  • Lyle, John (1758)
  • Macky, John (1773)
  • Millsaps, Thomas (1759)
  • Piper, Daniel (1823)
  • Rankin, Richard (1796)
  • Runkle, Samuel (1802)
Tax Records
  • Property Books 1782 to 1787
  • Property Books 1820 to 1827
  • Property Books 1836-1860
  • Property Books 1876-1879
  • Property Books 1881 to 1900
  • Property Books (Staunton) 1802, 1804-1807
LinkedinTwitterFacebook

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Friday, February 17, 2017

Those Who Left Home #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net

Those Who Left Their Homes for Bounty Lands

Ruined Tobacco CropNot everyone was not the fortunate eldest son who traditionally inherited the family-seated plantation. Thus, it was left to younger sons to find respectable occupations. When war came, most young men elected to fight. At first, everybody signed up for three-month intervals in order to be able to be home during planting and harvest times. The pension records reflect that this 3-month interval was repeated time and time again by the same people. The longer periods of time in service meant land grants. After the war, their commanding officer testified to service given and the bounty lands were granted. By the time of the Revolutionary War, land in Virginia was pretty well depleted from tobacco crops. Thus, it benefited everyone for veterans to take up new land. Many Virginia accepted land grants in Georgia along the eastern coast. Thomas Preston of Bedford County served, and as a Major during the War of 1812. Afterwards, he received bounty lands in Jasper County, Georgia. Another soldier from Bedford County was William Pullen who served in the 14th Regiment of the Continental Line, serving seven years in all. Pullen slew a British officer in hand-to-hand combat. Afterwards, he also took up bounty grants in Georgia.

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Zachary Taylor of Colonial Virginia #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net

Zachary Taylor Sr. of Lawrence, Virginia

Rapidan RiverZachary Taylor, a son of James Taylor who donated the above land to the Middle Church, was born in old Spotsylvania County (now Orange) and was married to Elizabeth Lee, the daughter of Hancock Lee of Westmoreland County. In 1727 the father of Zachry gave him 1000 acres of land "at the Little Mountains and on ye south side Rapidan River in St. George's Parish, Spotsylvania County" This tract was located at the foot of the Great Mountains, beginning at the land of George Penn, adjoining Thomas Hamm and Henry Madison. 

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe