Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Images of Hanover Co. VA Wills and Estates #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Hanover County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Court House Records



Old Church TavernHanover County, Virginia was formed on November 26, 1720 from New Kent County. It was named after King George I of England,who was the Elector of Hanover in Germany. 

Digital Images of Wills 1785 to 1893
Testators:Anderson, Alexander ;Anderson, John ; Anderson, John F. ;Baker, Martin; Blair, James ;Boswell, Benjamin ;Bowe, John ;Bowe, Nathaniel ;Bowe, William ;Bowles, William ;Brawn, Milton ;Christee, Charles; Cocke, Francis ; Cocke, Joseph A. ;Cocke, William ;Cross, Nathaniel ;Dabney, Mehitabel ;Darracott, John ;DeJarnette, William ;Dickie, Barbara ;Dunn, Thomas ;England, William ;Gardner, John ;Gentry, David ; Gibson, Henry ;Glenn, German ;Glenn, Hannah ;Goodman, Timothy ; Goven, Archibald ;Grantland, Samuel ;Graves, Herman ;Green, William ;Hambleton, Sarah ;Harris, Thomas; Honeyman, Robert; Hughes, John; Jones, Thomas ;Kennedy, Martin; Kidd, Pelman; King, Henry ;Lankford, Sarah ;Littlepage, Sarah; Lord, Reuben ; Lyons, Peter ;McCook, Neal ;Mills, Charles; Mitchell, Charles ; Nelson, Edward ;Norment, J. B.;Parsley, William ;Pate, Maria ; Patterson, James ;Picot, Josephine Micault ;Pollard, William ; Priddy, Thomas ;Pryor, William ;Ragland, Pettus ;Reerie, J. E. Payson ;Richardson, John ;Schick, Petters ;Sims, Patrick ; Smith, Richard G.; Snead, Edwin ;Spindle, Fanny ; Stewart,Daniel ;Strong, Jane ;Strong, Judith ;Thornton, Anthony ;Thornton, John ;Timberlake, Francis; Traincum, Austin ; Wharton, Charlott ;Whitlock, David
Digital Images of in the Circuit Court 1852 to 1865
Testators: Braxton, Carter; Clarke, Thomas G.; Gardiner, Thomas S. ;Gentry, Henry D.; Nuckulls, Reuben; Robinson, Moses; White, Susan
Digital Images of Hanover County Wills, Book 1, 1862-1868 
Testators: Anderson, John T.; Archer, Obediah; Atkins, Lucy B.; Atkisson, Andrew; Batt, Dumas; Berkeley, Billy Landon; Berkeley, Edmund; Blunt, Francis ;Bowles, Lucy; Brown, John D.; Bumpass, Polly; Carpenter, William W. ;Carraway, George ;Carter, Bartlett ;Carter, Thomas; Carver, Elizabeth Rose ;Chiles, William; Clarke, Elizabeth C.; Clough, George A.; Clough, John; Cooke, John ;Crenshaw, Eliza; Crenshaw, Nathaniel ;DeJarnett, William U. ;Dillard, Stephen ;Dowell, Sally Ann; Fleming, Maria ; Ford, Samuel ;Fortune, James; Fox, Thomas ;Gilman, Mary ;Green, Harriett M. ;Gregory, Thomas ;Gwathmey, Richard; Hundley, George; Jones, Catharine; Jones, John B.; Kersey, Henry; Minor, Lucius H.; Moreley, Mary Ann; Nelson, Robert H.; Nuckols, Charles G. ;Overton, Samuel ;Pollard, William T. H. ;Redd, Sally ;Royster, John ;Royston, Mary; Saunders, John C. ;Slaughter, David S. ;Snydner, Edward ;Snydner, William B.;Stack, John ;Stanley, Abram ;Stewart, Daniel (2) ;Stone, William P. ;Tate, B. F.; Tate, Maria W.; Taylor, John J. ;Terrell, Charles ;Thornton, Sarah ;Timberlake, Archibald; Timberlake, Elizabeth; Tinsley, Thomas; Todd, Samuel ;Tucker, John ;Utley, John ;Vaughan, Joseph; Via, Gilson ;Via, William; Wash, Edmund ;White, Mildred; White, Silas ;White, William ;Winston, William ;Yarbrough, Jesse G. ;Yeamans, Francis; Yeamans, Pleasant
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills in the Circuit Court 1785 to 1893
  • Index to Circuit Court Wills, Inventories, Estates, 1852 to 1865
  • Index to Wills, Inventories, Estates 1862 to 1893
Miscellaneous Hanover County Wills, Estates, available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Allen, James, LWT, transcript
Beal, John (transcript)
Brown, Benjamin, LWT (transcript)
Clay, John, LWT (transcript)
Coles, Walter, LWT (transcript)
Dandridge, Nathaniel West, LWT (transcript)
Fleming, William, LWT (transcript)
Glen, James, LWT (transcript)
Henry, Patrick, Rev., LWT (transcript) (1777)
Hill, James, LWT (transcript)
Hudson, George, LWT (transcript)
Lipscombe, Nathaniel, LWT (transcript)
Meriwether, Nicholas, LWT (1744)
Page, Robert, LWT (1744)
Street, Charles P., LWT (transcript)
Thomson, John, LWT (transcript)
Turner, William, LWT (1836) (transcript)
Walton, John, Last Will and Testament

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Monday, June 26, 2017

Historical Beginning of William and Mary College #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Dr. James Blair and William and Mary College

William and MaryA Scotch ecclesiastic by the name of Dr. James Blair, Commissioner of the Established Church and member of the Council whose dream it was to erect a college raised a fairly large sum in promised subscriptions before sailing to England where he collected more. Tillotson, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Stillingfleet, Bishop of Worcester, helped him in this endeavor. Also, the King and Queen inclined a favorable ear, and, though he met with opposition in certain quarters, Blair at last obtained a Charter for the erection of a college in Virginia which would be sustained by taxation. Thus, he sailed to Virginia with the charter in hand and a plan to construct "a seminary of ministers of the gospel where youths may be piously educated in good letters and manners; a certain place of universal study, or perpetual college of divinity, philosophy, languages and other good arts and sciences." Virginians were anxious to educate their sons, therefore, the Assembly of Virginia, for the benefit of the college, taxed raw and tanned hides, dressed buckskin, skins of doe and elk, muskrat and raccoon. The construction of the new seat of learning was begun at Williamsburg. When it was completed and opened to students, it was named William and Mary College. Its name and record shine fair in old Virginia. Colonial worthies in goodly number were educated at William and Mary, as were later revolutionary soldiers and statesmen, and men of name and fame in the United States. Three American Presidents, viz: Jefferson, Monroe, and Tyler were trained there, as well as Marshall, the Chief Justice, four signers of the Declaration of Independence, and many another man of mark. In the year 1704, just over a decade since Dr. Blair had obtained the charter for his College, the erratic and able Governor of Virginia, Francis Nicholson, was recalled. For all that he was a wild talker, he had on the whole done well for Virginia. He was, as far as is known, the first person actually to propose a federation or union of all those English-speaking political divisions, royal provinces, dominions, palatinates, or what not, that had been hewed away from the vast original Virginia. He did what he could to forward the movement for education and the fortunes of the William and Mary College. But he is quoted as having on one occasion informed the body of the people that "the gentlemen imposed upon them." Again, he is said to have remarked of the servant population that they had all been kidnapped and had a lawful action against their masters. "Sir," he stated to President Blair, who would have given him advice from the Bishop of London, "Sir, I know how to govern Virginia and Maryland better than all the bishops in England! If I had not hampered them in Maryland and kept them under, I should never have been able to govern them!" To which Blair had to say, "Sir, if I know anything of Virginia, they are a good-natured, tractable people as any in the world, and you may do anything with them by way of civility, but you will never be able to manage them in that way you speak of, by hampering and keeping them under!" *

* William and Mary College Quarterly, vol. I, p. 66. 

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Everyday Life in Colonial Days #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Everyday Life in Colonial Days

Before the Revolutionary War, people were not allowed to be outside after dark. It was the night watchman's job to make sure that no one broke this rule. The colonists were required to attend church service or be punished. If a man stayed away from church for a month without a good excuse, he might be put in the stocks or into a wooden cage. No word could be spoken with im[Pg 128]punity against the church or the rulers. He who used his tongue too freely was placed in the pillory or stocks, or was fined, and in some extreme cases he lost his ears. Additionally, tithing was mandatory, and Virginians furnished his local glebe with pds. of tobacco (used as currency). The local parish houses were primitive, first constructed with logs and oiled paper used for windows. Since there was no stove inside, women often carried foot-stoves, which, by definition were small sheet-iron boxes containing a few hot coals. The sermons lasted two hours or more and upon the pulpit stood an hour-glass, which a deacon would reverse when the sands of the hour had fallen through. Pews were hard, and sleeping was considered a serious offense. The minister, or a watchful tithingman, held a long stick prod which reached into the pews to awake people. 

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Images of Spotsylvania Co. VA Wills and Estates #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Spotsylvania County Genealogy, Wills, Indentures, Bonds



Walnut Grove Plantation

Spotsylvania County was named for Alexander Spotswood, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia from 1710 to 1722. It was formed from Essex, King and Queen and King William counties in 1720. 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1722 to 1749
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1722 to 1749 (second index)
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1749 to 1760
Images of Wills 1722 to 1749
  • Allen, Thomas
  • Blake, John
  • Ellis, Robert
  • Goodloe, Henry
  • Grayson, Ambrose
  • Hollady, John
  • Leavil, Edward
  • Martin, John
  • Morris, Thomas
  • Samuel, Anthony
  • Taylor, James
Images of Wills 1749 to 1760
  • Allan, John
  • Allen, Elizabeth
  • Barnes, Thomas
  • Battaley, Mary
  • Bullard, Ambrose
  • Carr, William
  • Carter, Joseph
  • Chew, John
  • Childs, Richard
  • Collins, Joseph
  • Collins, Thomas
  • Fox, John
  • Garton, Uriah
  • Gilbert, John
  • Goodloe, Elizabeth
  • Gordon, John
  • Hawkins, Nicholas
  • Herndon, Edward
  • Hunter, William
  • Lynn, William
  • Mathis, Benjamin
  • Matthews, William
  • Minor, John
  • Minor, William
  • Moor, Robert
  • Musick, George
  • Pollard, Ame
  • Procter, William
  • Pulliam, Thomas
  • Rawlins, James
  • Reeves, George
  • Shepard, George
  • Spotswood, John
  • Stubblefield, George
  • Taliaferro, Francis
  • Thomas, Owen
  • Thornton, Francis
  • Waller, Dorothy
  • Waller, John
  • Waller, William
  • Warren, Elizabeth
  • Warren, Thomas
  • White, Agnes

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Sunday, June 25, 2017

The Public Stocks Punishment #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

The Public Stocks

stocks and pilloryEveryday life in Colonial times had a unique method of dealing with criminals. The laws were rigid and punishments severe. Interestingly, criminals were occasionally branded with a hot iron; however, if a man went hunting on Sunday, he was often publicly whipped. Small offenses were also punished under the designation of "scolds" (scolded). A woman who had been complained of as a scold was placed in front of her house with a stick tied in her mouth. Sometimes a common scold was fastened to what was known as a "ducking stool" at one end of a seesaw plank, and ducked in a pond or river! Some crimes were punished by making the offender stand up on a stool in some public place, while fastened to his breast was a large placard on which his crime was printed in coarse letters, as LIAR or THIEF. In some colonies the use of public whipping posts were applied against hardened offenders. The culprit was seated on a bench in a public place, his feet projecting through holes in a plank (or the pillory) where he had to stand up with his neck and wrists painfully confined in a similar way. These last two modes of punishment were a source of no small amusement to the throng which gathered around and jeered. This type of public shame sufficiently served to deter crime.  Accomack County VA Genealogy & Histories

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Gabriel Jones, the King's Attorney #history #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Gabriel Jones, the King's Attorney

BogotoGabriel Jones of Wales came to Virginia in 1720 but returned to England to study the law. Following his admission to the bar and the death of his mother in 1745, Jones was persuaded by either Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, the landowner of the Northern Neck Proprietary, or his relative Hugh Mercer to return to Virginia. On March 1, 1747, he acquired a tract of land along Opequon Creek near present-day Kernstown in 1747 and became the private secretary to Lord Fairfax. During April of 1746 he was appointed to serve as the King's attorney as a young man 22 years of age, duty which also included Augusta County. He was a member of the House of Burgesses of Virginia in 1748, and he was subsequently re-elected to his seat during the 1749 Legislative session. Jones was again elected to represent Frederick County in the House of Burgesses in 1752, but resigned the following to serve as the coroner of Fairfax County. In 1753, Jones relocated from Kernstown in Frederick County to his estate "Bogota" in Augusta County (present-day Rockingham County near Port Republic. 

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Saturday, June 24, 2017

Braddock's Retreat #history #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

William Peake

Braddock's DefeatWilliam Peake signed a memorial to Her Majesty, Queen Anne, in regard to the death of her late brother-in-law, from King William County, Virginia. Peake was several times vestryman for Truro Parish and a member of the Fairfax County Militia in 1756. It is said that Peake was with General Washington at Braddock's Defeat during the summer of 1755 when the British attempted to capture the French Fort Duquesne during the French and Indian War. The defeat occurred at the Battle of the Monongahela on July 9th and the survivors retreated. 

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Friday, June 23, 2017

Images of Frederick Co. VA Wills, Estates #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Frederick County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates


Belle Grove Plantation
Frederick County was named for Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales and the eldest son of George II. It was created from Orange County in 1738; part of Augusta County was added later. The county seat is Winchester.

Frederick County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Digital Images of Frederick County Wills 1743 to 1751 
Testators: Alford, John; Anderson, Thomas; Ballender, Josiah; Barrett, Arthur; Berry, Patrick; Borden, Benjamin; Branson, Thomas; Brown, Thomas Sr.; Buice, John; Chenowoth, Joseph; Dumas, Lewis; Gillaspy, Patrick; Hart, Daniel; Helm, Leonard; Hobson, George; Hoge, William; Hollingsworth, Abraham; Hollingsworth, Ann; Howell, William; Jesper, William; Job, Hannah; Jones, Spencer; Lilburn, Anna; Little, Thomas; Littler, John; Loftin, Thomas; Lucas, Rebecca; McHenry, Barnaby; McKell, James; McMahan, William; McName, Bayan; Melderick, John; Mellon, John; Meter, John; Moon, Simon; Morris, Samuel; Movebought, Jacob; Neill, John; Nickton, John; Parker, Gilbert; Parrott, Hugh; Paul, Hugh; Ross, Alexander; Ross, David; Tomson, Samuel
Miscellaneous Records
  • Crumbs, Henry H., LWT (1776) (digital image)
  • Mckee, Robert, LWT, transcription
  • Denton, John, LWT (1767) (digital image)
  • Reagan, John, LWT (1775) (digital image)
  • Hopewell Friends History 1734-194, misc. pages
  • Marriages 1771-1825, misc. pages
  • Marriage Bonds (Tilman to Webb)

County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors

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Thursday, June 22, 2017

Surviving the Indian Massacre of 1622/23 #genealogy #history #virginiapioneers.net

Henry Carsley Survived Indian Massacre

Old Plantation CreekHenry Carsley came to Virginia in 1621 at the age of 23 years. Two years later, when the Muster was taken he was a resident of Newport News and was listed as one of the workers of Daniel Goodkin. Goodkin was engaged in the business of shipping cattle into the colony for breeding purposes, however, it did not succeed. Carsley settled on the eastern shore and survived the 1622/1623 Indian massacre. During 1633 he petitioned the court held at Accomack for a lease of 50 acres of land located upon Old Plantation Creek on the southside of Fishing Creek. 

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